Nemo me impune lacessit

No one provokes me with impunity

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No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

Article 1, Section 9, Constitution of the United States

If this is the law of the land...why in a republic (little r) and as republicans, do we allow mere POLITICIANS to the right to use a "title of office" for the rest of their lives as if it were de facto a patent of nobility. Because, as republicans, this should NOT be the case...just saying...

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Tuesday, October 06, 2009

The Federalist Papers

A comment from pelicanmarsh68
When was this written exactly? I'm trying to put it into a better context historically. Can you let me know?

Yes, it's taken from the a web site that has online documents...the Constitution, The Declaration of Independence, and all the Federalist papers. The Federalist papers were a series of essays published in newspapers in the primarily in New York originally in 3 newspapers: the Independent Journal, the New-York Packet, and the Daily Advertiser. The first appeared on October 27, 1787. The three writers, Hamilton, Madison and Jay published the essays at a furious pace for the period, considerin that EVERYTHING was first written by hand. At times, three or four new essays appearing under the name of Publius appearing in a week. The authors used the pen name "Publius," to honor the Roman consul Publius Valerius Publicola. Additionally, Hamilton encouraged the reprinting of the essays in newspapers beyond New York state. In fact they were published in many states where the ratification debate still ongoing.
Alexander Hamilton (51 articles: nos. 1, 6–9, 11–13, 15–17, 21–36, 59–61, and 65–85)
James Madison (29 articles: nos. 10, 14, 37–58, and 62–63), and
John Jay (5 articles: 2–5 and 64).
Nos. 18–20 were the result of a collaboration between Madison and Hamilton.

Additionally, these men were the principal authors of the US Constitution

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